Ask or search something about android

applications - What does APK stand for? What is the internal format?


Wednesday 22nd of September 2010 / android.stackexchange.com
Is APK an abbreviation for Android Package Kit? What about the file itself? Is it an archive such as ZIP where during install the installer extracts and copies the files onto the file system?
posted on: apk
read more

What does sbf stand for??


Friday 29th of October 2010 / droidforums.net
What does sbf stand for?? My best guess is system boot format. I'm just curious. I found info online calling it superbase 95 file... but I think that's for another system; not android. Sent via DROID X 2.2 rooted running Rubix Focused 1.0 on Verizon Wireless
posted on: Hacking Help
read more

Soft-Bricked - What do boot options mean?


Friday 24th of February 2012 / androidforums.com
Hi!I think I just bricked my phone... I was trying to upload an .apk of Tasks+ to the phone (no Warez stuff, but can't find it outside of Market and don't have a Google acc), when the install process froze (transmit worked). I tried it again with a different version, same problem, so I decided I would just try a reboot. Everything looked phine while the Motorola logo was displayed, it disappeared as usual, but then nothing came up; the screen stayed backlit, but black. adb was not able to connect to the device, and wiping the cache from Android Recovery didn't help.Now, I am presented with several choices at boot time, and unfortunately, I cannot find any explanation of what they mean. They are the following:FastbootNvFlashBP HW Bypass RSDBP HW Bypass QC DLOADBP HW Diag & Boot APBP HW Bypass BP OnlyBP HW Bypass RSDAndroid RecoveryBoot Android (No BP)Device UIDconsole=tty50,115200n8Early Usb EnumerationBP toolsRSDCan anyone explain what the acronyms stand for, and what each choice does? I found the choices mention quite a bit when searching, but they were never fully explained, an
posted on: Hacking Help
read more

Google Jumps In To Defend HTC and Android


Wednesday 03rd of March 2010 / androidspin.com
This is what most of us have been waiting for, wondering when it was going to happen, asking ourselves “What does Google think about this lawsuit?”. Well Endgadget received a statement from a a Google spokesperson saying:“We are not a party to this lawsuit. However, we stand behind our Android operating system and the partners who have helped us to develop it.”What exactly does this mean for HTC in the fight against Apples outrageous lawsuit? Will Google be lending any help in HTCs legal defense, or maybe helping in some other way? It’s hard to tell but whenever this trial sees the courtroom, we will found out exactly how things will go down.[via Engadget]
posted on: Newsflash
read more

Android Market Ruled by the People, Not Google


Tuesday 25th of August 2009 / androidguys.com
About 1% of all apps that are uploaded to the Android Market are removed by Google.  Even with such a low percentage, it still begs the question “Does Google play gatekeeper to the Market?”  The answer is both yes and no.Google allows the users of the Android Market to help decide what abides by their policies.  If an application is flagged enough times, it gets reviewed by Google who then makes the determination as to whether or not to remove the application.  Google does not stand in the way of allowing an app into the Market in the same way Apple does with their App Store.  In short, there is no pre-approval process. As of today’s writing, there are roughly 6,000 apps in the Market, which equates to around 60 apps getting pulled. Android users seem to have a good grasp as to what is quality and what can be considered buggy, malicious, or objectionable.The Android Market has plenty of room for improvement to be sure.  However, the approval/removal process that is currently in place seems to work well.  Letting the mob rule was a good decision
posted on: News
read more

What Does Your Smartphone Replace?


Tuesday 28th of August 2012 / androidforums.com
So I read a very interesting article about what it would take to take the place of a smart phone. (I thought this would be fun to talk about.)Here is the link: Your Smartphone's So Smart It Takes 14 Gadgets to Match It 1) Tell me what your smart phone has replaced? 2) How many devices would it take, to do the same things your smart phone can do? 3) And How much would the total cost be for those items?I have an Atrix 4G w/Lapdock that expands the full function of my phone. My total cost with apps is $424. I have a total of 15 items, that would cost me $1,692, to take the place of my Atrix 4G and Lapdock. So here is my list, with pricing of each individual item as of today's prices.1) Digital Camera - Android Free; $54 - Kodak EasyShare C1505 12 MP;2) Stand Alone GPS - Android Google Maps - free and CoPilot Live (Offline use) $10; $120 - Garmin nuvi 40 4.3" 3) MP3/CD Player/Radio Turner - Android $5 PowerAMP Pro and free iHeart radio; $149 - Samsung - Galaxy Player 3.6" 8GB4) Digital Recorder - Android - free; $230 - JVC Everio HD5) Portable DVD Player - Android Google Video
posted on: Android Lounge
read more

Twitter Closes TweetDeck Deal For More Than $40 Million


Thursday 23rd of May 2013 / androidpolice.com
This whole ordeal seemed a little surreal since day one of the rumors, but earlier today, Twitter and TweetDeck finalized an agreement which would see Twitter take ownership of the popular multi-platform social media app. The price is reported to have been over $40 million in cash and stock.Twitter has always had stand-offish relations with the many 3rd party applications which tap into its own service, heavily restricting the manner in which such apps can use and present Twitter feeds. TweetDeck, though, has become wildly popular for its integrated feed system, which combines Twitter, Facebook, and Google Buzz all into a customizable multi-pane user experience.TweetDeck's Android app has also seen substantial success. The buyout by Twitter was a bit of a surprise after reports last month suggested UberMedia (which owns Twidroyd) was in talks to acquire TweetDeck. That deal never closed, apparently (we don't even know if it made it to the negotiation table, frankly.)What does this mean for TweetDeck users? In the short-term, probably not much - TweetDeck should continue to be up and
posted on: News
read more

Root Lingo?


Monday 10th of October 2011 / androidforums.com
I am new to the Android world. I recently dumped my 3Gs for the AT&T GS2. I had my iPhone jailbroken and I understand rooting is somewhat similar. However I do not understand any of this root lingo and it scares me to death to attempt to root the phone before I know exactly what it is I can do with it being rooted.So my question is what is this root lingo?What is a ROM exactly? What does it stand for? What does it do? Why use them?What is CMW? What does it mean, and what is it?What is CM7? etc...These things are things I constantly see, but have no clue what they are and the research I have done has not been clear to me.I mean I am pretty technology savy, but I am not catching on to this whole rooting concept and lingo yet.Also last thing is in your opinion is it worth rooting and how complicated is the process to root the GS2? Thanks
posted on: News
read more

Android Forums - View Single Post - What does sbf stand for?


Monday 17th of January 2011 / androidforums.com
suckIT bootloader foolsSorry boobless femalesSICK (of) BOOTLOADER FORTIFICATION
posted on: News
read more

Changes for SMS apps coming in KitKat - could this mean they are coming to Hangouts?


Monday 14th of October 2013 / feedproxy.google.com
Text messaging apps stand to get a whole lot better— and, yes, likely will include Google's own Hangouts appThe Android Developers blog wants the people developing third-party SMS apps to get ready for some big changes to come with KitKat.The short version is that you can now "officially" make an application the default for sending and receiving SMS and MMS messages, as opposed to the old way of using hidden (not public) APIs and intents. That sort of coding works, but it's subject to change at any time and break all the apps that use it. The new method allows the system to receive and send messages, then use system defaults to decide where to display it. Developers should be sure to give the blog post a read, as the concept and new requirements are laid out nicely.Now, what does that mean for us? Everyone wants the Hangouts app to send and receive SMS messages. The first step needed for that to happen is to make receiving a message (and sending one) a system function that can be handled by any default application. That's what Google is doing here. With t
posted on: News
read more
androidbeing.com 2013